11 9 / 2013

danikhaleesi:

aegonthedragonlord:

allerasphinx:

swampjaeger:

reasons why everything about game of thrones is beyond repair

There’s so much I want to say, but I’m on my phone and typing is hard.

Oh so this is what people are getting pissy about now? Ethnic as not white Irishmen. You see in Game of Thrones there’s people that aren’t white and they need this thing called background actors. To make them all look like they are from the same place they want a certain type of look such as an ethnic person. Every Unsullied has the same look so do the Dothraki.

A white group of people that are Dothraki doesn’t make sense because they are from a hot place and are always in the sun traveling on horse so you’re going to be tan. A dark skinned person born and raised in the North wouldn’t make sense due it being freezing most of the time with minimum sun.

Stop getting your panties in a wad and actually do a little thing called research and have some common sense.

^^^^^ This. I am SO SICK of all the ‘social justice bloggers’ or whatever jumping down Game of Thrones throat for EVERY. SINGLE. ‘RACIST’. thing. Half the time they’re not being racist, YOU’RE just creating the issue!!!

How come there was no big deal when they called for white background actors for Kings Landing, or Qarth, or anywhere else in Westeros?!?! More white people died on this show than black/’ethnic’ people. 

Westeros is predominately white. They are not as mixed as we are these days because traveling was not as easy for people ‘back then’ and therefore there was not as much immigration going on. Just like our own history. Essos is predominately darker-skinned because of the region it is. So this casting is very likely Essos. 

I’m going to stop following all my Game of Thrones blogs I follow…. They are completely destroying the show I love. NOT the show, but the bloggers. I can find a race/feminist issue in every show/book/movie/etc. if I pick it apart enough.

I like how it’s the bloggers that are “destroying the show” and now the people making the show and putting the sexist and racist content in it. Cognitive dissonance, eh?

03 8 / 2013

urihu:

evzimus:

8prometheus8:

urihu:

8prometheus8:

fatpinkcast:

I was walking the floor of SDCC when I did a double take.   This was at artist Gary Gianni’s booth in the illustrator section of the floor…there was a painting of a white woman with dragons, with a black woman kneeling in front of her.  Ugh, I thought, but then I read the signs and realized this was actually A Song of Ice and Fire/Game of Thrones officially licensed artwork!

Every year, George RR Martin officially releases a calendar by a famous fantasy artist depicting his world in ASOIAF.  I know this because he’s been doing this for a while and he never hesitates to eagerly plug the calendar on his livejournal.  Last December, Martin wrote “ Gary has finished nine of the twelve paintings as I write, and they’re all more spectacular than the last.”

There is some lovely artwork in the calendar—for example, one of the paintings hanging up on the booth was a sweet one of Ned holding Needle while Arya Stark sits on the bed, unsure of what will happen next.  The official blurb for the calendar describes Gianni’s artwork as:

"capturing both [ASOIAF’s] epic scope and most intimate moments. Revered by many…Gianni’s classically composed, richly detailed art harkens back to the golden age of illustration.*”

Which would be awesome if harkening back to the golden age of illustration didn’t also including harkening back to some of the more racist bits of the golden age.   (Seriously, check out the people at ComicCon waxing poetic about the Golden Age of anything and you’ll see very interesting demographic divides.)   The Golden Age of Illustration took place between the Civil War and WWII.  I think this blurb is supposed to make use excited about this Golden Age except this golden age is when stuff like golliwog and Black Sambo showed up so I don’t think PoC feel the same nostalgia.

I apologize for not taking better pictures of the painting—I assumed there would be one of it already somewhere online, but google preview happens to skip this page.   To be honest, I was kind of agog that this painting even exists.  Having woken the dragon multiple times over the past two months in critiquing how race is depicted in Game of Thrones, I found myself groaning and feeling rather tired as I waded through the fanboys ogling the calendar to get a shot of this painting.  

How many people saw this painting but didn’t see the anti-blackness inherent in it?  How many times does this franchise have to screw up on race before people own up to it?   It doesn’t have to be intentional to hurt, it doesn’t have to be intentional or malicious in order to perpetuate stereotypes or open old wounds.   Yes, it’s fantasy, but there are such things as racist fantasies, and each creator makes choices and decisions that have consequences.

So it’s just a painting of Daenerys Targaryen—a painting that manages to encapsulate all at once the problems this franchise currently has with race.   From the white lady Jesus Mhysa scene to the erasure of Dorne as a PoC house, and now, to this—characters of color as servants and decoration, nameless and kneeling.    

This could have  been a painting of Dany laughing with Irri and Jhiqui, it could have been a painting of Dany sharing stories or diplomatic strategy with Missandei.  It could have been a painting of Dany doing any of the many awesome things she has done throughout the series.

No.  It’s a painting of a black woman, I think topless, kneeling in front of a reclined white woman and providing musical entertainment while the white woman plays with her pets.

Art doesn’t exist in a vacuum—it’s influenced by different styles and techniques and historical contexts and the one here is ugly and racist.  The composition of this painting mirrors racist depictions of black servants and white women in 16th-18th century European art.  

After the Middle Ages and Renaissance there was a shift in how black people were depicted in European art.   While religious art in the Middle Ages and Renaissance  would depict PoC royalty (eg. nativity scenes with the three Kings interacting with Madonna) and black heroes like St. Maurice, white artists began to depict PoC, namely black PoC, in servile roles, as diminutive creature either standing behind his Mistress or kneeling at her feet.”  (Pieterse, 1998)   (I’ll give you a guess as to the sociopolitical factors behind why this shift occurred…)

The black African attendant to a white European protagonist is an iconographic trope in art history.   Seen in European artwork as well is the depiction of Africans as musicians as part of the stereotype that black Africans are “entertainers.”  (Earle, 2005)

The “Moor as a servant” became a familiar figure in artwork depicting wealthy individuals, particularly white ladies.  Their inclusion in paintings was a status symbol.   The black servant was a “stylistic feature, a decorative element…a feature added to provide contrast in colour, pictorial variety and extra lustre, for the same reasons that a scene would be enriched with, for instance, domestic animals.” (Pieterse, 1998)  For example, Dutch art in the 1690s would depict the white master with dogs and a black servant; the white subject would interact with the dogs while ignoring the black servant, communicating that the black servant was lowlier than the pets (Blakely, 1993)

When black servants were depicted next to a wealthy white woman in these paintings, the contrast in skin color was intentional.  During this time white women’s fairness “inspired fervent odes of praise” and the inclusion of a Moor in the painting was intended to highlight how the white woman was “radiantly fair by comparison.”  (Pieterse, 1998) (Pinder, 2002)   (Cue a long history of using PoC as props to uphold white beauty standards.)

This picture of Dany with the black musician is particularly reminiscent of 1830 orientalist paintings—“a recurrent fantasy is a harem like situation in which languid, European, but orientally-adorned women are served by a black page.”  (Pieterse, 1998)   ”One of the black servant’s central functions in the visual arts of the 18th and 19th centuries was the sexualize the society in which he or she is found.”   (Sander Gilman, BBC.) In many 18th century paintings the black woman would be depicted more sexually than the white woman (here she is topless but Dany is, thankfully clothed) to help convey the hidden sexuality of the white woman (Pinder, 2002)  

Anyhow, this isn’t anything new, it’s just a tribute to the same old oppressive imagery that has been used to orientalize PoC in the service of the male gaze for several hundred years now.  

And I suppose ASOIAF/GOT depicting PoC in a really terrible way is kind of old news now…but I guess I was still disappointed when I saw it.

-M

Let me summarize this. “Hur hur a fictional universe has naked black people for shame.”

That. That’s basically all this person is saying I’m all for equal rights and social justice, but in works of fiction like this it’s normally a REALLY STUPID IDEA to apply our social conventions to them.That’s like someone getting pissed off at a history book for saying ‘Nigger used to be a far more accepted term when blacks were enslaved, but now it is considered to be a highly profane and inappropriate slur.’

This is not a history book. This is an art book. With visual conventions that convey meaning. Those conventions have a history behind them. This person just told us the history of the way this painting is composed, the use of color, the use of gesture and symbol and what it used to mean. Then this person proceeded to express concern over the fact that those same artistic modes of expression are uncritically used today BECAUSE THEY ARE OFFENSIVE AND BECAUSE THEY PROMOTE OPPRESSION OF PEOPLE BY OTHER PEOPLE.

You have a problem with that but not with the offensive picture? You haven’t the slightest problem with the racist message being conveyed in visual medium but you have a problem when a person points it out?

You should have ended your rant with ”I am all for equal rights and social justice” but the very fact that you have boldly written the n-word for all the world to see really tells me what kind of social justice and equal rights proponent you really are, you lying hypocrite.

Thing is, I don’t see an offensive picture there. And getting offended over a painting of a fictional universe entirely different from our own is rather silly. The character shown above is just going about her business as usual, and that picture is pretty TAME compared to a vast majority of what you see in the Game of Thrones series. I’m not denying that there’s a great deal of sexist and racist content in it. But bitching and moaning about the LEAST RACIST CHARACTER IN THE ENTIRE SERIES Is like saying Martin Luther King Jr. was too damn pale to stand up for blacks.

She is a leader, and she stands up for and fights for her people. And even though she is very pale and white compared to them, she has fought and struggled to earn their acceptance, and sees them as her equals, and sees them as people she would die for. She empathizes with them, tries to see that all their needs are met, and does everything that she does for THEIR SAKE. In a world that is culturally centered around a pissing match over power hinging upon the winter Apocalypse, she is a VERY BENEVOLENT LEADER. So if you’re going to bitch about the racism in the Game of Thrones, look towards the Lanchesters or the Starks, and the Boy King. Don’t look at the least racist and the most CULTURALLY ACCEPTING woman in the entire fucking series. And for the record, quite a few of the Dothrakki women will go around topless, simply because it’s part of how their culture works. It would be more rude of her to tell the woman to put a shirt on, and more unaccepting of their culture. 

And BELIEVE me, with how that culture works, that woman would not be doing a damn thing to her feet if she did not get just as much respect as she is giving there. If she was really as racist and nasty as you’re claiming, she would have been killed long before then.

So no, I haven’t the slightest fucking problem with the fact that the image portrays how much respect she has earned from her people through blood sweat and tears. I have a problem with the fact people are getting the wrong message, rather than what is ACTUALLY being portrayed. 

So, is that settled then, or are you going to start lobbing more personal attacks over a fucking painting?

I would like to point out that that woman saved their lives in-universe, because she could not stand to see them enslaved. She torched the entire city, and had the entire leadership killed in order to free their slaves and in doing so they worshiped her. Khaleesi is probably the most not-racist character in the entirety of Westeros, she is most likely the most open-minded one as well. Then again, it is ASOIAF so I have no idea. *steps out*

What is being discussed is not in-universe message, but the ‘real world’ message, ie. we are not talking about Dany, we are talking about the painting. Or maybe I am talking to the wall.

12 6 / 2013

notjustanydoctor:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Final Season 3 Scene in Game of Thrones
Surfed Google News looking for what reviewers thought about the White Lady Jesus scene.

“It’s kind of weird that the show decides to rely on the slightly racist, definitely cliche stereotype of hordes of adoring brown slaves worshipping their white liberator.” - Kate Walsh, Indiewire


“…the messianic tint to Danaerys’ brief appearance takes on a weirdly racist and pro-colonial overtone (look at those poor, dark savages and how much they love their blond savior!)” - Todd Brown, Twitchfilm


“…her being surrounded by a worshipful mass of people she’s saved who are decidedly, er, browner than her is really frakking weird. I’m not saying there’s malicious, racist intent or anything, and some of the slaves are probably just tanned white people. But as an image, I found it really offputting.” - Rebecca Pahle, The Mary Sue


“I think we’re supposed to feel tense and apprehensive awaiting their response to her setting them free, but I’m just kind of bored. No surprise – they accept her, calling her “mother.” She crowd surfs while her dragons fly above the crowd. Also, she’s very white and all the slaves definitely aren’t and so maybe this is racist? I’d call for discussion but this is the internet so better not.” - Dr. Improbable, The OutHousers


“During Game of Thrones‘ first season, the show faced criticism that it was racially… not super sensitive when it came to portraying the Dothraki, who were largely treated as Klingons noble savages…Now, Dany has become a straight-up conqueror—an outsider who swoops in with her dragons and eunuchs to show other societies how they’re doing things wrong. Which is where things start to feel a little dodgy: The final shots of this season were supposed to be rousing, but they felt weird. 
There was Dany, seriously the Whitest Woman Ever, crowd-surfing on a bunch of heretofore unseen and uncharacterized brown people, all of whom had been enslaved and helpless before she showed up? And they’re lovingly calling her “Mother”?” - Erik Henriksen, Wired.com


“Yes, this is problematic. The optics on this scene are really bad, which I can see you have noticed, because you have eyes. Problem one is that there aren’t very many people of color people on this show to begin with, and problem two is that when there are, they tend to be acting out “tribal” stereotypes and/or cast in the role of slaves. And this final scene featured largest crowd of brown faces we’ve ever seen, lifting the world’s blondest woman up as their messiah and praising her for saving them from bondage. It’s like George W. Bush’s secret fantasy of how he thought the invasion of Iraq would go for him (including the blond wig).
“If you’ve never heard of the White Savior phenomenon in media, wherein a fictional white outsider appears to heroically save fictional people of color from problems they can’t solve on their own, there’s more information here. Or you can just take a screenshot at any point in the last minute of the show, since it’s pretty much textbook. And that’s another problem, while we’re counting problems: I feel like I’ve seen this trope so many times before that it feels emotionally flat and boring, especially in comparison to her astonishingly badass siege of Astapor.” - Laura Hudson, Wired.com


“Also, I can’t even express how uncomfortable her last scene (the last scene of the season) made me feel. This show has always had issues with race and unfortunately, by having hundreds of faceless brown people lifting up a young, white blonde woman and calling her “mother,” showrunners are far from correcting them. It was Greyworm (and friends) who liberated the city. Can’t he get some love?”- Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


The Khaleesi of previous seasons, and even previous season three episodes, seemed to care little for titles that others were so eager to attach to her. But it’s that blissful smile, that obvious Christ pose while being hoisted above the crowd, her blonde hair and pearly whiteness shining upon a sea of trodden-upon brown people that lead one to wonder if all this savior stuff is finally going to her head. - Gabriel Ruzin, Screen Invasion


“The final image is still that of a white woman being embraced by the poor slaves she set free, and on a show that has been validly criticized for its lack of diversity in its main cast, ending a season with that scene was a questionable choice. We understand why the writers thought it was a good direction to go — viewers needed some real hope after the Red Wedding — but there were probably ways to direct it that would have taken the sting out of the visual.” - Rebecca Martin, Wetpaint


“So, um, did anyone else think it was a little weird to have a bunch of dusky brown people reaching out to the blonde white lady and proclaiming her their savior? Dany’s crusade to free slaves and whatnot is admirable, sure, but that scene seemed to say “Hooray! The nice white lady saved us!” Kinda got a weird vibe. Was anyone else made ever so slightly uncomfortable?”  - Joe Streckert, Portland Mercury


It’s an image that many commentators found troubling, given Game of Thrones‘ overwhelming whiteness, and the presentation of many non-white people as barbarians, deceptive slavers, or mindless slaves.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Think Progress


“And not to end on a sour note — because I did think “Mhysa” was a tight, elegant episode — but did anyone else watch the final scene outside Yunkai and think, ‘Hmmm, am I really looking at a pretty white lady being worshiped by thousands upon thousands of adoring brown people?’” - Nina Shen Rastogi, New York Magazine


“The show’s previously been careful to maintain a heterogeneous look for most of the cultures Daenerys encounters in her travels through the eastern continent of Essos, so the uniformly brown skin tone of the freed slaves worshipping the blondest possible savior figure was surprising and disconcerting – doubly so since, in the books, much is made of just how many different kinds of people had been forced into slavery by Yunkai and then freed by Dany when she took the city. This uncomfortable contrast kneecapped what could otherwise have been the most purely uplifting and cathartic moment in the series so far. Plus it gave the episode its title and was, you know, the final shot of the season – a rough one to go out on. “ Sean T. Collins, Rolling Stone


Did anyone seem to put into consideration that in this time era that they are trying to portray-Slaves were of color. Thats how it was-because humans arent the smartest. i think its dumb that they are belittling this scene. this scene was not about race. this scene was about how she freed them. she killed the people who enslaved them and they were happy. they chose to stay with her. its not about race-its about beign a good person.

"in this time era that they are trying to portray…"
THE TIME ERA OF DRAGONS THAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED.

notjustanydoctor:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Final Season 3 Scene in Game of Thrones

Surfed Google News looking for what reviewers thought about the White Lady Jesus scene.

“It’s kind of weird that the show decides to rely on the slightly racist, definitely cliche stereotype of hordes of adoring brown slaves worshipping their white liberator.” - Kate Walsh, Indiewire

“…the messianic tint to Danaerys’ brief appearance takes on a weirdly racist and pro-colonial overtone (look at those poor, dark savages and how much they love their blond savior!)” - Todd Brown, Twitchfilm

“…her being surrounded by a worshipful mass of people she’s saved who are decidedly, er, browner than her is really frakking weird. I’m not saying there’s malicious, racist intent or anything, and some of the slaves are probably just tanned white people. But as an image, I found it really offputting.” - Rebecca Pahle, The Mary Sue

“I think we’re supposed to feel tense and apprehensive awaiting their response to her setting them free, but I’m just kind of bored. No surprise – they accept her, calling her “mother.” She crowd surfs while her dragons fly above the crowd. Also, she’s very white and all the slaves definitely aren’t and so maybe this is racist? I’d call for discussion but this is the internet so better not.” - Dr. Improbable, The OutHousers

“During Game of Thrones‘ first season, the show faced criticism that it was racially… not super sensitive when it came to portraying the Dothraki, who were largely treated as Klingons noble savages…Now, Dany has become a straight-up conqueror—an outsider who swoops in with her dragons and eunuchs to show other societies how they’re doing things wrong. Which is where things start to feel a little dodgy: The final shots of this season were supposed to be rousing, but they felt weird.

There was Dany, seriously the Whitest Woman Ever, crowd-surfing on a bunch of heretofore unseen and uncharacterized brown people, all of whom had been enslaved and helpless before she showed up? And they’re lovingly calling her “Mother”?” - Erik Henriksen, Wired.com

“Yes, this is problematic. The optics on this scene are really bad, which I can see you have noticed, because you have eyes. Problem one is that there aren’t very many people of color people on this show to begin with, and problem two is that when there are, they tend to be acting out “tribal” stereotypes and/or cast in the role of slaves. And this final scene featured largest crowd of brown faces we’ve ever seen, lifting the world’s blondest woman up as their messiah and praising her for saving them from bondage. It’s like George W. Bush’s secret fantasy of how he thought the invasion of Iraq would go for him (including the blond wig).

“If you’ve never heard of the White Savior phenomenon in media, wherein a fictional white outsider appears to heroically save fictional people of color from problems they can’t solve on their own, there’s more information here. Or you can just take a screenshot at any point in the last minute of the show, since it’s pretty much textbook. And that’s another problem, while we’re counting problems: I feel like I’ve seen this trope so many times before that it feels emotionally flat and boring, especially in comparison to her astonishingly badass siege of Astapor.” - Laura Hudson, Wired.com

“Also, I can’t even express how uncomfortable her last scene (the last scene of the season) made me feel. This show has always had issues with race and unfortunately, by having hundreds of faceless brown people lifting up a young, white blonde woman and calling her “mother,” showrunners are far from correcting them. It was Greyworm (and friends) who liberated the city. Can’t he get some love?”- Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

The Khaleesi of previous seasons, and even previous season three episodes, seemed to care little for titles that others were so eager to attach to her. But it’s that blissful smile, that obvious Christ pose while being hoisted above the crowd, her blonde hair and pearly whiteness shining upon a sea of trodden-upon brown people that lead one to wonder if all this savior stuff is finally going to her head. - Gabriel Ruzin, Screen Invasion

“The final image is still that of a white woman being embraced by the poor slaves she set free, and on a show that has been validly criticized for its lack of diversity in its main cast, ending a season with that scene was a questionable choice. We understand why the writers thought it was a good direction to go — viewers needed some real hope after the Red Wedding — but there were probably ways to direct it that would have taken the sting out of the visual.” - Rebecca Martin, Wetpaint

“So, um, did anyone else think it was a little weird to have a bunch of dusky brown people reaching out to the blonde white lady and proclaiming her their savior? Dany’s crusade to free slaves and whatnot is admirable, sure, but that scene seemed to say “Hooray! The nice white lady saved us!” Kinda got a weird vibe. Was anyone else made ever so slightly uncomfortable?”  - Joe Streckert, Portland Mercury

It’s an image that many commentators found troubling, given Game of Thronesoverwhelming whiteness, and the presentation of many non-white people as barbarians, deceptive slavers, or mindless slaves.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Think Progress

“And not to end on a sour note — because I did think “Mhysa” was a tight, elegant episode — but did anyone else watch the final scene outside Yunkai and think, ‘Hmmm, am I really looking at a pretty white lady being worshiped by thousands upon thousands of adoring brown people?’” - Nina Shen Rastogi, New York Magazine

“The show’s previously been careful to maintain a heterogeneous look for most of the cultures Daenerys encounters in her travels through the eastern continent of Essos, so the uniformly brown skin tone of the freed slaves worshipping the blondest possible savior figure was surprising and disconcerting – doubly so since, in the books, much is made of just how many different kinds of people had been forced into slavery by Yunkai and then freed by Dany when she took the city. This uncomfortable contrast kneecapped what could otherwise have been the most purely uplifting and cathartic moment in the series so far. Plus it gave the episode its title and was, you know, the final shot of the season – a rough one to go out on. “ Sean T. Collins, Rolling Stone

Did anyone seem to put into consideration that in this time era that they are trying to portray-Slaves were of color. Thats how it was-because humans arent the smartest. i think its dumb that they are belittling this scene. this scene was not about race. this scene was about how she freed them. she killed the people who enslaved them and they were happy. they chose to stay with her. its not about race-its about beign a good person.

"in this time era that they are trying to portray…"

THE TIME ERA OF DRAGONS THAT ACTUALLY HAPPENED.

(via feelingstuck-y)

12 6 / 2013

russellduckett:

aamerrahman:

image

I’m late to Game of Thrones - but I caught up. And I couldn’t help photoshopping this picture of Khal Drogo as a Klingon. Anyone sad enough to be familiar with both GOT and Star Trek knows exactly what I’m talking about.

The Klingons are the Dothraki of Star Trek -…

This is fucking fiction, no one brings race into to it but people. Stop trying to put racist thoughts into my Game of Thrones!

Agreed! Show runners, you stop it, stop right now! Stop bringing/making the show racist! *hits D&D with newspaper*

11 6 / 2013

ephemeral-end:

silliiboo:

stfusexists:

deliciouskaek:

martinerat:

tealrallythong:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Final Season 3 Scene in Game of Thrones
Surfed Google News looking for what reviewers thought about the White Lady Jesus scene.

“It’s kind of weird that the show decides to rely on the slightly racist, definitely cliche stereotype of hordes of adoring brown slaves worshipping their white liberator.” - Kate Walsh, Indiewire


“…the messianic tint to Danaerys’ brief appearance takes on a weirdly racist and pro-colonial overtone (look at those poor, dark savages and how much they love their blond savior!)” - Todd Brown, Twitchfilm


“…her being surrounded by a worshipful mass of people she’s saved who are decidedly, er, browner than her is really frakking weird. I’m not saying there’s malicious, racist intent or anything, and some of the slaves are probably just tanned white people. But as an image, I found it really offputting.” - Rebecca Pahle, The Mary Sue


“I think we’re supposed to feel tense and apprehensive awaiting their response to her setting them free, but I’m just kind of bored. No surprise – they accept her, calling her “mother.” She crowd surfs while her dragons fly above the crowd. Also, she’s very white and all the slaves definitely aren’t and so maybe this is racist? I’d call for discussion but this is the internet so better not.” - Dr. Improbable, The OutHousers


“During Game of Thrones‘ first season, the show faced criticism that it was racially… not super sensitive when it came to portraying the Dothraki, who were largely treated as Klingons noble savages…Now, Dany has become a straight-up conqueror—an outsider who swoops in with her dragons and eunuchs to show other societies how they’re doing things wrong. Which is where things start to feel a little dodgy: The final shots of this season were supposed to be rousing, but they felt weird. 
There was Dany, seriously the Whitest Woman Ever, crowd-surfing on a bunch of heretofore unseen and uncharacterized brown people, all of whom had been enslaved and helpless before she showed up? And they’re lovingly calling her “Mother”?” - Erik Henriksen, Wired.com


“Yes, this is problematic. The optics on this scene are really bad, which I can see you have noticed, because you have eyes. Problem one is that there aren’t very many people of color people on this show to begin with, and problem two is that when there are, they tend to be acting out “tribal” stereotypes and/or cast in the role of slaves. And this final scene featured largest crowd of brown faces we’ve ever seen, lifting the world’s blondest woman up as their messiah and praising her for saving them from bondage. It’s like George W. Bush’s secret fantasy of how he thought the invasion of Iraq would go for him (including the blond wig).
“If you’ve never heard of the White Savior phenomenon in media, wherein a fictional white outsider appears to heroically save fictional people of color from problems they can’t solve on their own, there’s more information here. Or you can just take a screenshot at any point in the last minute of the show, since it’s pretty much textbook. And that’s another problem, while we’re counting problems: I feel like I’ve seen this trope so many times before that it feels emotionally flat and boring, especially in comparison to her astonishingly badass siege of Astapor.” - Laura Hudson, Wired.com


“Also, I can’t even express how uncomfortable her last scene (the last scene of the season) made me feel. This show has always had issues with race and unfortunately, by having hundreds of faceless brown people lifting up a young, white blonde woman and calling her “mother,” showrunners are far from correcting them. It was Greyworm (and friends) who liberated the city. Can’t he get some love?”- Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


The Khaleesi of previous seasons, and even previous season three episodes, seemed to care little for titles that others were so eager to attach to her. But it’s that blissful smile, that obvious Christ pose while being hoisted above the crowd, her blonde hair and pearly whiteness shining upon a sea of trodden-upon brown people that lead one to wonder if all this savior stuff is finally going to her head. - Gabriel Ruzin, Screen Invasion


“The final image is still that of a white woman being embraced by the poor slaves she set free, and on a show that has been validly criticized for its lack of diversity in its main cast, ending a season with that scene was a questionable choice. We understand why the writers thought it was a good direction to go — viewers needed some real hope after the Red Wedding — but there were probably ways to direct it that would have taken the sting out of the visual.” - Rebecca Martin, Wetpaint


“So, um, did anyone else think it was a little weird to have a bunch of dusky brown people reaching out to the blonde white lady and proclaiming her their savior? Dany’s crusade to free slaves and whatnot is admirable, sure, but that scene seemed to say “Hooray! The nice white lady saved us!” Kinda got a weird vibe. Was anyone else made ever so slightly uncomfortable?”  - Joe Streckert, Portland Mercury


It’s an image that many commentators found troubling, given Game of Thrones‘ overwhelming whiteness, and the presentation of many non-white people as barbarians, deceptive slavers, or mindless slaves.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Think Progress


“And not to end on a sour note — because I did think “Mhysa” was a tight, elegant episode — but did anyone else watch the final scene outside Yunkai and think, ‘Hmmm, am I really looking at a pretty white lady being worshiped by thousands upon thousands of adoring brown people?’” - Nina Shen Rastogi, New York Magazine


“The show’s previously been careful to maintain a heterogeneous look for most of the cultures Daenerys encounters in her travels through the eastern continent of Essos, so the uniformly brown skin tone of the freed slaves worshipping the blondest possible savior figure was surprising and disconcerting – doubly so since, in the books, much is made of just how many different kinds of people had been forced into slavery by Yunkai and then freed by Dany when she took the city. This uncomfortable contrast kneecapped what could otherwise have been the most purely uplifting and cathartic moment in the series so far. Plus it gave the episode its title and was, you know, the final shot of the season – a rough one to go out on. “ Sean T. Collins, Rolling Stone


& then from all the graphics fandom blogs i reblog from
they’re just upholding the white colonial savior worshipping just blindly
& i’m just like
wait
you fuckers don’t see anything wrong-
oh wait you’re white as hell, too
welp

If D&D weren’t already racist, misogynist dickbags before, they for sure sealed the deal with this fucked up ending. 
The books were problematic enough with the white savior trope, but the show really took the time to cram it in our faces, especially with the whole crowd-surfing thing. 
Have I mentioned I really hated the finale?

OH BUT WAIT I GOT CALLED 50 DIFFERENT NIGGERS FOR CALLING THIS SHIT OUT YESTERDAY BUT WHITE MEDIA CALLS IT OUT AND IT’S ACCEPTABLE CRITIQUE
OK
And by OK i mean FUCK THAT

All of this. The critique of that heavy handed, gross scene, and then the critique of those critiques. (Because seriously, I have seen so many bloggers of color get verbally assaulted for pointing out this SAME SHIT in these books looooong before there was a visualization to demonstrate just how gross this storyline is.)

I know this is selfish but THANK FUCKING GOD THIS IS BEING CRITIQUED BECAUSE I FELT SICK TO MY STOMACH AND WAS TERRIFIED THAT PEOPLE WOULD BE DEFENDING IT.
I’m so sick of feeling like I have to stand alone in nerd culture sometimes against my family and peers. I like knowing people have my back.
Super selfish, I know. But… this is gross. This is the second time they’ve tainted my favorite character with problematic bullshit.

not defending the lack of diversity but do people not realize this is set in a more medieval time? there simply just wasn’t that much diversity then… If you visit history, it’s painfully obvious that until a certain time there wasn’t any diversity because it was just so damn hard for people to travel anywhere! Asians stayed over in the East & white people stayed over in the west and like that was it. People just stayed put. That’s all this show is doing… it’s like when people complained about how Pixar’s ‘Brave’ didn’t feature a character of color but a person of color wouldn’t be in fucking 14th century Scotland or wherever the hell they were. It’s just the way things were back then… I understand racism still exists but when you have tv shows/movies/books/etc. that are set in a medieval/fantasy world, it’s hard to include people of color unless they’re slaves. it sucks but that’s what makes it authentic.

"I understand racism still exists but when you have tv shows/movies/books/etc. that are set in a medieval/fantasy world, it’s hard to include people of color unless they’re slaves. it sucks but that’s what makes it authentic."

omg lol wut

ephemeral-end:

silliiboo:

stfusexists:

deliciouskaek:

martinerat:

tealrallythong:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Final Season 3 Scene in Game of Thrones

Surfed Google News looking for what reviewers thought about the White Lady Jesus scene.

“It’s kind of weird that the show decides to rely on the slightly racist, definitely cliche stereotype of hordes of adoring brown slaves worshipping their white liberator.” - Kate Walsh, Indiewire

“…the messianic tint to Danaerys’ brief appearance takes on a weirdly racist and pro-colonial overtone (look at those poor, dark savages and how much they love their blond savior!)” - Todd Brown, Twitchfilm

“…her being surrounded by a worshipful mass of people she’s saved who are decidedly, er, browner than her is really frakking weird. I’m not saying there’s malicious, racist intent or anything, and some of the slaves are probably just tanned white people. But as an image, I found it really offputting.” - Rebecca Pahle, The Mary Sue

“I think we’re supposed to feel tense and apprehensive awaiting their response to her setting them free, but I’m just kind of bored. No surprise – they accept her, calling her “mother.” She crowd surfs while her dragons fly above the crowd. Also, she’s very white and all the slaves definitely aren’t and so maybe this is racist? I’d call for discussion but this is the internet so better not.” - Dr. Improbable, The OutHousers

“During Game of Thrones‘ first season, the show faced criticism that it was racially… not super sensitive when it came to portraying the Dothraki, who were largely treated as Klingons noble savages…Now, Dany has become a straight-up conqueror—an outsider who swoops in with her dragons and eunuchs to show other societies how they’re doing things wrong. Which is where things start to feel a little dodgy: The final shots of this season were supposed to be rousing, but they felt weird.

There was Dany, seriously the Whitest Woman Ever, crowd-surfing on a bunch of heretofore unseen and uncharacterized brown people, all of whom had been enslaved and helpless before she showed up? And they’re lovingly calling her “Mother”?” - Erik Henriksen, Wired.com

“Yes, this is problematic. The optics on this scene are really bad, which I can see you have noticed, because you have eyes. Problem one is that there aren’t very many people of color people on this show to begin with, and problem two is that when there are, they tend to be acting out “tribal” stereotypes and/or cast in the role of slaves. And this final scene featured largest crowd of brown faces we’ve ever seen, lifting the world’s blondest woman up as their messiah and praising her for saving them from bondage. It’s like George W. Bush’s secret fantasy of how he thought the invasion of Iraq would go for him (including the blond wig).

“If you’ve never heard of the White Savior phenomenon in media, wherein a fictional white outsider appears to heroically save fictional people of color from problems they can’t solve on their own, there’s more information here. Or you can just take a screenshot at any point in the last minute of the show, since it’s pretty much textbook. And that’s another problem, while we’re counting problems: I feel like I’ve seen this trope so many times before that it feels emotionally flat and boring, especially in comparison to her astonishingly badass siege of Astapor.” - Laura Hudson, Wired.com

“Also, I can’t even express how uncomfortable her last scene (the last scene of the season) made me feel. This show has always had issues with race and unfortunately, by having hundreds of faceless brown people lifting up a young, white blonde woman and calling her “mother,” showrunners are far from correcting them. It was Greyworm (and friends) who liberated the city. Can’t he get some love?”- Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

The Khaleesi of previous seasons, and even previous season three episodes, seemed to care little for titles that others were so eager to attach to her. But it’s that blissful smile, that obvious Christ pose while being hoisted above the crowd, her blonde hair and pearly whiteness shining upon a sea of trodden-upon brown people that lead one to wonder if all this savior stuff is finally going to her head. - Gabriel Ruzin, Screen Invasion

“The final image is still that of a white woman being embraced by the poor slaves she set free, and on a show that has been validly criticized for its lack of diversity in its main cast, ending a season with that scene was a questionable choice. We understand why the writers thought it was a good direction to go — viewers needed some real hope after the Red Wedding — but there were probably ways to direct it that would have taken the sting out of the visual.” - Rebecca Martin, Wetpaint

“So, um, did anyone else think it was a little weird to have a bunch of dusky brown people reaching out to the blonde white lady and proclaiming her their savior? Dany’s crusade to free slaves and whatnot is admirable, sure, but that scene seemed to say “Hooray! The nice white lady saved us!” Kinda got a weird vibe. Was anyone else made ever so slightly uncomfortable?”  - Joe Streckert, Portland Mercury

It’s an image that many commentators found troubling, given Game of Thronesoverwhelming whiteness, and the presentation of many non-white people as barbarians, deceptive slavers, or mindless slaves.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Think Progress

“And not to end on a sour note — because I did think “Mhysa” was a tight, elegant episode — but did anyone else watch the final scene outside Yunkai and think, ‘Hmmm, am I really looking at a pretty white lady being worshiped by thousands upon thousands of adoring brown people?’” - Nina Shen Rastogi, New York Magazine

“The show’s previously been careful to maintain a heterogeneous look for most of the cultures Daenerys encounters in her travels through the eastern continent of Essos, so the uniformly brown skin tone of the freed slaves worshipping the blondest possible savior figure was surprising and disconcerting – doubly so since, in the books, much is made of just how many different kinds of people had been forced into slavery by Yunkai and then freed by Dany when she took the city. This uncomfortable contrast kneecapped what could otherwise have been the most purely uplifting and cathartic moment in the series so far. Plus it gave the episode its title and was, you know, the final shot of the season – a rough one to go out on. “ Sean T. Collins, Rolling Stone

& then from all the graphics fandom blogs i reblog from

they’re just upholding the white colonial savior worshipping just blindly

& i’m just like

wait

you fuckers don’t see anything wrong-

oh wait you’re white as hell, too

welp

If D&D weren’t already racist, misogynist dickbags before, they for sure sealed the deal with this fucked up ending. 

The books were problematic enough with the white savior trope, but the show really took the time to cram it in our faces, especially with the whole crowd-surfing thing. 

Have I mentioned I really hated the finale?

OH BUT WAIT I GOT CALLED 50 DIFFERENT NIGGERS FOR CALLING THIS SHIT OUT YESTERDAY BUT WHITE MEDIA CALLS IT OUT AND IT’S ACCEPTABLE CRITIQUE

OK

And by OK i mean FUCK THAT

All of this. The critique of that heavy handed, gross scene, and then the critique of those critiques. (Because seriously, I have seen so many bloggers of color get verbally assaulted for pointing out this SAME SHIT in these books looooong before there was a visualization to demonstrate just how gross this storyline is.)

I know this is selfish but THANK FUCKING GOD THIS IS BEING CRITIQUED BECAUSE I FELT SICK TO MY STOMACH AND WAS TERRIFIED THAT PEOPLE WOULD BE DEFENDING IT.

I’m so sick of feeling like I have to stand alone in nerd culture sometimes against my family and peers. I like knowing people have my back.

Super selfish, I know. But… this is gross. This is the second time they’ve tainted my favorite character with problematic bullshit.

not defending the lack of diversity but do people not realize this is set in a more medieval time? there simply just wasn’t that much diversity then… If you visit history, it’s painfully obvious that until a certain time there wasn’t any diversity because it was just so damn hard for people to travel anywhere! Asians stayed over in the East & white people stayed over in the west and like that was it. People just stayed put. That’s all this show is doing…

it’s like when people complained about how Pixar’s ‘Brave’ didn’t feature a character of color but a person of color wouldn’t be in fucking 14th century Scotland or wherever the hell they were. It’s just the way things were back then…

I understand racism still exists but when you have tv shows/movies/books/etc. that are set in a medieval/fantasy world, it’s hard to include people of color unless they’re slaves. it sucks but that’s what makes it authentic.

"I understand racism still exists but when you have tv shows/movies/books/etc. that are set in a medieval/fantasy world, it’s hard to include people of color unless they’re slaves. it sucks but that’s what makes it authentic."

omg lol wut

22 5 / 2013

khaleesiboadicea:

Someone left this delightful review on fatpinkcast’s itunes page.

Too Haughty (at times shrill)  

I was so excited to find a podcast with all ladies.  I’ve listened to this podcast for the past three episodes and it is not for me.  Even with my advanced education and my career working with very pompous professionals—these ladies take the cake.  It seems like some of the ladies try way too hard to sound intellectual and it is off-putting.  I wish they can go through an episode without excessive complaining.  -Maddie Brow.”

Hmm, haughty and shrill. Well golly, I’ve never heard those presented as criticisms when women have ever tried to say anything of import. Shrill, adjective:

piercing, high, sharp, acute, piping, penetrating, screeching, high-pitched, ear-splitting, ear-piercing the shrill whistle of the enginepiercing deep, soft, soothing, velvety, mellifluous, dulcet, sweet-sounding, well-modulated, silver-toned.

I’m going to go out on a limb here and bet they didn’t mean soothing or mellifluous. I’m also pretty sure that shrill is on the list of top 5 words to avoid if you don’t want to be called out for gendered criticisms—haughty’s probably in the top 10. It’s like they were desperately trying to win bingo.

I don’t know about people who listen, but I don’t think we’re shrill. Not only that, but yet again our attitudes and the way we’ve chosen to consume to the series, analyse it, and articulate our objections and praises—is up for criticism. Not our knowledge about the subject and not the way we’ve structured the subject matter. But our attitudes.

Way to prove our point.

I shall wear it as a badge of honor.

(Source: allerasphinx)

20 5 / 2013

fatpinkcast:

No.

I DO think those who feel they are overreacting are boiling the outcries down to LOLZ BOOK FANZ R COMPLAINING AGAIN! And I think that is a FAR too simple way to view this change.

It’s an issue of autonomy. It’s the writers of the show consistently making decisions that rob the female characters of agency to make the men around them look better. It’s annoying as hell and people have every right to be angry about it. I don’t think it’s my place or ANYONE’s place to say they’re “overreacting.”***

HOWEVER, I do think given the way Sansa’s story has been written this season what the writers decided to do makes the most sense. That scene would’ve only had a place if FROM THE BEGINNING they showed this wedding experience from Sansa’s point of view. Obviously they’re not interested in that, so we didn’t get it. 

Sad, isn’t it?

It’s not like including that scene would’ve been impossible. They could’ve allowed Sansa to express how she felt about the marriage to Margaery while Margaery listens. In silence. Silence here would’ve been key because I don’t think (and I will never agree with the writer’s choice on this) she has a place to tell Sansa how she should view the situation. Would’ve been an excellent place to put in her wonderful “Why should I spare his feelings, when nobody cares about mine?” line…

-S

***Not to attack you anon (PLEASE don’t let the following dissuade you from commenting again! I swear this is not directed towards you!) but can I just express how much I hate the word “overreacting”? I’ve been seeing this word used a lot lately to silence issues that some fans have with the choices the writers make for characters that don’t fit the Straight White Male standard (Tyrion being the obvious exception). As a WOC, I just can’t handle it. It’s such an exhausting thing for me to express discontent at instances of marginalization (be it through my gender and/or my race) and have people tell me I’m overreacting. It’s very discouraging…

made rebloggable by request

13 5 / 2013

khaleesiboadicea:

So, maybe I read this wrong, but was there an implication that Marg is queer?

was that just me picking up on nothing?

In the books? Definitely!

(Source: allerasphinx)

06 5 / 2013

contrarianne:

I’m so fucking fed up with the treatment of prostitutes in Game of Thrones, like wow. D&D treat their sex worker (and, in Doreah’s case, ex-sex worker) characters exactly like the men of Westeros treat them: good for cheap, quick titillation, but ultimately disposable and valueless outside of their ability to flash their lady bits for the benefit of the viewer/customer. 

06 5 / 2013

thenorthdismembers:

nobodysuspectsthebutterfly:

I really really really hate that this was an otherwise mostly — if not really — good episode. Y’know why? ‘Cos I was watching and not able to enjoy it because I knew what would happen. ‘Cos the FAIL will be overlooked. ’Cos people won’t

06 5 / 2013

Ugh

It’s not even that casual.

25 4 / 2013

fatpinkcast:

Will Jaime suffer septicemia from rolling around in the mud? Does Brienne have promise as a future career motivator? How did Varys get such a great shipping rate from across the Narrow Sea? These questions answered and more in this week’s episode of Fat Pink Cast!

Non-spoiler time stamp: 00:00:00-01:01:30

Spoiler time stamp: 01:01:31-01:36:39

Subscribe and review us at Fat Pink Cast on iTunes!

HERE’S WHAT YOU MISSED LAST WEEK

Episode 8: And Now His Watch is Ended

FPC chats about the brothel game show, Jaime’s handjob, and Edmure the floppiest trout.

WHAT’S UP NEXT WEEK

Episode 10: Kissed by Fire (s3, ep5)

The Hound is judged by the gods; Jaime is judged; Jon proves himself; Robb is betrayed; Tyrion learns the cost of weddings.

Apparently there’ll be a whole lot of judging and we can’t wait!

I took my turn at the editing for this podcast!  Hope I did okay!  Enjoy everyone.

18 4 / 2013

fatpinkcast:

House Tully is finally in the house!

In this episode, FPC chats about the brothel game show, Jaime’s handjob, Edmure the floppiest trout, and lest you think we’re ignoring the important stuff, some serious discussion of the use of sexual violence in the series.

Please be aware of the triggering nature of some of the content (including mentions of rape and sexual assault) critiqued in this podcast.

That said, we hope you enjoy listening and appreciate the open dialogue!

Non-spoiler time stamp: 00:00:00-01:11:07

Spoiler time stamp: 01:11:08-01:46:46

HERE’S WHAT YOU MISSED LAST WEEK

Episode 7: Dark Wings Dark Words

FPC experiences fannish rapture over the Queen of Thorns and Margaery Tyrell.

WHAT’S UP NEXT WEEK

Episode 9: And Now His Watch is Ended (s3, ep4)

This is the fourth episode of the third season of Game of Thrones, written by executive producers David Benioff & D.B. Weiss and directed by Alex Graves.

Check below for more details on s3, ep4: And Now His Watch is Ended

Read More